A day in the life of a Lexmark employee: Pablo Martinez Diaz

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Meet Pablo Martínez Díaz. He is a self-described computer mad scientist — originally from Spain — who has lived half his life in foreign countries.

Pablo joined Lexmark France in 2007, and four years ago he moved to Switzerland to be part of the business development team for Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA). He is now back in Spain and working remotely on the same team.

“We just moved back to Spain from Switzerland,” said Pablo. “We are still in full re-entry shock. I thought I was Spanish, but I guess I’m not anymore.”

His wife, Donnamarie, is a teacher from New York. If you ask his kids where they are from, they will tell you they just don’t know. His two oldest sons, Pablo (15) and Danny (13), were both born in Spain. His youngest, Chris (10), was born in France. All three have been raised in both France and Switzerland while studying at various international schools and spending the summers between New York and Madrid.

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There is no television at home. The family enjoys spending time together, building electronic gadgets and restoring antique furniture, gramophones, vintage photo cameras, old mopeds, mechanic calculators and anything else they can get their hands on.

So what does a typical day in and out of the office look like for Pablo? We asked him to document a day in his life to find out.

  • 6 a.m. My alarm goes off. I take a quick shower and eat breakfast before the family wakes up. This is my time to think, learn something new or just relax.
  • 7 a.m. The rest of the family wakes up and starts to get ready for the day.
  • 8 a.m. The kids are walking to school and I am driving to Lexmark Madrid. It is about a 15-30 minute commute.
  • 8:36: Time to read and process email I received from my U.S. counterparts during the night.
  • 9:30 Project time. Four hours of quality time working without interruption in Sales Enablement. My headphones are on and today I am listening to Daft Punk, Billy Joel and MOOG.
  • 1:30 p.m. Eating lunch with my Spanish colleagues. Here in Spain lunch is a big deal. Three courses, dessert and coffee.
  • 2:30 p.m. Catching up with my boss in Switzerland via Jabber.
  • 3 p.m. Involved in a managed print services (MPS) brainstorming session with a business development manager in Spain. We are working on an opportunity to add solutions to help a customer solve pain points.
  • 4 p.m. Reading market intelligence mail coming from the Philippines and posting some information on Lexmark’s internal communication platform.
  • 5 p.m. Working on MPS and industry solutions campaigns for major countries in EMEA.
  • 6 p.m. Time to rush back home to do homework with kids.
  • 7 p.m. Homework time. French poetry with my little one, math with the middle one and a Spanish essay with my oldest.
  • 8 p.m. My turn to cook. Spanish tortilla, tapas and Iberico ham it is.
  • 8:30 p.m. Dinner is ready.

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  • 9 p.m. “Sobremesa” time. There is no English translation — it is “so” Spanish there isn’t a word in any other language that compares. Sobremesa is the casual conversation after dinner, sitting at the table, typically sipping tea or coffee. Today’s subject of conversation: “How to convert the volume carbon resistor of an old Gameboy to some sort of digital thing that uses two buttons instead of a dial.”
  • 9:30 p.m. Preparing the school bags and schedules for tomorrow. All the boys are reading, playing with electronics or coding.
  • 9:45 p.m. Time to calm down and go to sleep.
  • 10 p.m. Finally time for me and my wife. She is correcting exams and preparing for classes. I am working on my next robot. We chat casually and share our day.
  • Midnight I finish my day off reading. Current book: “The Edge of Eternity” by Ken Follet.

In closing, Pablo said this about working at Lexmark: “I get to reinvent myself every day at Lexmark. One day I might be adapting a presentation coming from the U.S. to the European market, the next I might be onboarding a new software partner, and the following day I may be coding html and giving a presentation at an IDC event. I love it.

“Lexmark is a big company that has retained a small company ambiance, where everyone knows each other. I am proud to be a ‘Lexmark-er’.”

Interested in reading more? Check out A day in the life of a Lexmark employee: Cherie Flueck.